The order that makes your chaos bearable.

stric·ture (strkchr)
n.
1. A restraint, limit, or restriction.
2. An adverse remark or criticism; censure.

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Posted by dnbjorn
http://flip.it/zvhkM @honestbobtattoo 
A piece from his 30x30 exercise from June 2013.

Posted by dnbjorn

http://flip.it/zvhkM @honestbobtattoo A piece from his 30x30 exercise from June 2013.

Posted by dnbjorn
http://flip.it/n7Jn9 
The flourish on the ‘u’ makes the ‘s’ hard to distinguish. Maybe color will fix?

Posted by dnbjorn

http://flip.it/n7Jn9 The flourish on the ‘u’ makes the ‘s’ hard to distinguish. Maybe color will fix?

(Source: cjwho)

(Source: lndscpr)

jaymug:

WWF Desertification: Elephant

jaymug:

WWF Desertification: Elephant

nevver:

Hammock tub

Beautiful idea.

nevver:

Hammock tub

Beautiful idea.

(Source: bungalowclassic)

homedesigning:

Exbury Egg: Amazing Self-Sustaining Floating Office Launches in the UK

Amazing? Yes. Purposeful? Maybe. Proof of concept at least.

blua:

Money Stacks Backpack - Available Here

blua:

Money Stacks Backpack - Available Here

hollywoodwhispers:

Ivana Tattoo Art

hollywoodwhispers:

Ivana Tattoo Art

homedesigning:

(via Neutral Wetroom)

homedesigning:

(via Neutral Wetroom)

blua:

Clever photography by Horacio Salinas

blua:

Clever photography by Horacio Salinas

(Source: boardsofhamburg)

cargocollection:

Reeeeeeeeeeeeks

cargocollection:

Reeeeeeeeeeeeks

iheartmyart:

Windswept by Charles Sowers 

Art installation fixed outside a gallery’s wall, displaying natural flow and turbulence of the wind - via dezeen:

Hundreds of spinning blades reveal the invisible patterns of the wind in American artist Charles Sowers’ kinetic installation on the facade of the Randall Museum in San Francisco.

The installation, titled Windswept, consists of 612 rotating aluminium weather vanes mounted on an outside wall. As gusts of wind hit the wall, the aluminium blades spin not as one but independently, indicating the localised flow of the wind and the way it interacts with the building.

“Our ordinary experience of wind is as a solitary sample point of a very large invisible phenomenon,” said Sowers. “Windswept is a kind of large sensor array that samples the wind at its point of interaction with the Randall Museum building and reveals the complexity and structure of that interaction.”

You can find out more at Dezeen here, with photos and a video of the work in action.

(via prostheticknowledge)